Useful tips on contact lens wear and care to help you get the best out of your contact lenses.

DO

  • Have regular check-ups as advised by your practitioner
  • Wash and dry your hands prior to handling your lenses
  • Rub, rinse and store your lenses in the recommended solution before and after each use (except single-use lenses, which should be discarded after each wear)
  • Clean the lens case with solution, wipe with a clean tissue then air-dry after each use
  • Always apply the same lens first to avoid mixing them up
  • Check the lens is not inside out before applying
  • Handle carefully to avoid damaging the lens
  • Apply your lenses before putting on make-up
  • Remove lenses then remove make-up
  • Keep your eyes closed when using hairspray or other aerosols
  • Replace your lens case at least monthly
  • Discard lenses and solutions that are past their expiry date
  • Wear only the lenses specified by your contact lens practitioner
  • Stick strictly to the recommended wearing schedule and replacement frequency
  • Make sure you have an adequate supply of replacement lenses or a spare pair
  • Have an up-to-date pair of spectacles for when you need to remove your lenses.

  • DON’T

  • Wear contact lenses during pregnancy
  • Use tap water, or any other water, on your lenses or lens case
  • Wet your lenses with saliva
  • Put a lens on the eye if it falls on the floor or other surface, without cleaning and storing again
  • Apply a lens if it is dirty, dusty or damaged
  • Continue to wear your lenses if your eyes don’t feel good, look good, or see well
  • Re-use or top up solution – discard and replace with fresh solution each time lenses are stored
  • Decant solution into smaller containers
  • Wear lenses left in the case for more than seven days without cleaning and storing them in fresh solution
  • Sleep in your lenses unless specifically advised to by your practitioner
  • Wear any lens overnight if you are unwell
  • Use your lenses for swimming, hot tubs or water sports, unless wearing goggles
  • Wear your lenses when showering unless you keep your eyes firmly closed
  • Switch the solution you use except on the advice of your practitioner
  • Use any eye drops without advice from your contact lens practitioner
  • Share contact lenses or wear any lenses not specified by your practitioner
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  • How to put them in:

  • First, wash your hands, and when you’re done, make sure they’re clean and dry.
  • Using the hand you write with, hold the lens on the tip of your pointer finger.
  • With your middle finger on the same hand, pull your lower eyelid down. At the same time, use your pointer finger on your other hand to pull your top lid up.
  • Look up.
  • Gently place the lens on the lower white part of your eye.
  • Remove your pointer finger, and let go of your eyelid.
  • Close your eyes for a second. The lens will center on your eye.
  • Repeat these steps for the other lens.
  • How to take them out:

  • First, wash your hands, and when you’re done, make sure they’re clean and dry.
  • Look up and pull your lower eyelid down with the middle finger of the hand you write with.
  • Put your index finger on the lower part of the lens.
  • Slide the lens down into the white part of your eye.
  • Squeeze the lens gently between your pointer finger and thumb and carefully remove it.
  • Repeat these steps for the other lens.
  • Eye care experts currently consider daily disposable lenses the safest soft contact lenses for your eyes. Talk to your eye care professional to determine which may be the best choice for you. Then follow his guidance on care.

  • Each day, wear your contacts only as long as your eye care professional recommended.
  • If you think you’ll have trouble remembering when to change your lenses, ask your eye care professional for a chart to track wearing schedule. If he doesn’t have one, consider creating one on your own.
  • Never wear another person's contact lenses, especially if someone has already worn them. Using other people's contact lenses can spread any infection or particles from their eyes to yours.
  • Do not sleep with contact lenses in your eyes unless you are prescribed "extended wear" contacts. Closed eyes don’t allow tears to carry a healthy amount of oxygen to your eyes.
  • Don't let the tip of solution bottles touch other surfaces, including fingers, eyes, or contact lenses. All of these can contaminate the solution.
  • Wearing contact lenses may cause your eyes to become more sensitive to sunlight. Wear sunglasses with total UV protection.
  • To keep eyes lubricated, use a re-wetting solution or plain saline solution that your eye doctor has approved.
  • If you accidentally insert contacts inside out, it won’t harm your eyes, but it will be uncomfortable. To avoid this, place a contact lens on the tip of your finger so that it forms a cup. Look at the contact lens from the side. If the cup looks like it is flaring out at the top and has a lip, the contact lens is inside out. If it looks like the letter "U", the contact lens is right side out.
  • If you develop any eye irritation, remove your contact lenses and don’t use them again until you talk with your eye care professional. Wearing a contaminated pair of lenses invites the infection to stay. When you get back to wearing contacts, closely follow your doctor's instructions to prevent eye infections.
  • Visit your eye doctor immediately if you have any sudden vision loss, persistent blurred vision, light flashes, eye pain, infection, swelling, unusual redness, or irritation.
  • • Protein: Depending on what kind of contact lenses you wear and how much protein your eyes deposit on your contacts, your doctor may recommend you use a product for protein removal.
    • While cleaning them does remove some protein, it can still build up on your lenses and make them uncomfortable. That's why the longer you wear lenses before replacing them, the more likely you are to need a protein remover.
    • For example, if you wear disposables, you probably won't need one; but if you wear the kind of lenses that are replaced only once or twice a year, you definitely will. Products for removing protein include enzymatic cleaner and daily protein removal liquids.
    • Eye dryness and irritation: Use contact lens eye drops to lubricate your eyes and rewet your lenses.
    • Eye sensitivity and allergies: A small percentage of lens wearers develop an eye allergy to the chemicals present in contact lens solutions. If this is the case with you, you don't need an additional product.